Brain Anatomy of the Child: Lateral ViewDiffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a type of brain tumor found in the pons, part of the brainstem on the lower back of the brain, near the top of the spinal cord. DIPG primarily affects children, with most diagnoses occurring between 5 and 7 years of age. DIPG makes up 10-15% of all brain tumors in children, with about 100-150 new diagnoses per year in the United States and about 300 per year in all of North America and Europe. Unlike many other pediatric cancers, there has been little progress in improving treatments and cure rates for DIPG over the last few decades. Unfortunately, fewer than 10% of children with DIPG survive two years from diagnosis

 

 

The name diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma describes how the tumor grows, where it is found, and what kinds of cells give rise to the tumor.

  • Diffuse means that the tumor is not well-contained: it grows out into other tissue so that cancer cells mix with healthy cells. For this reason, it is impossible to surgically remove DIPG tumors without damaging healthy tissue. This makes DIPG very hard to treat.
  • Pontine describes where the tumor is located. It is found in a part of the brain called the pons, near where the spinal cord meets the brain.  The pons is responsible for a number of important bodily functions, like breathing, sleeping, bladder control, and balance. Because these functions are vital to survival, the pressure from the growing tumor is very dangerous.
  • Glioma is a general term for tumors originating in glial cells. Glial cells are found throughout the brain. They make up the white matter of the brain that surrounds and supports the neurons (cells that carry messages in the brain). Gliomas can form in different areas of the brain. DIPG occurs in glial cells in the pons.
Learn About the Causes of DIPG
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